The Diary of Anais Nin Volume 1: 1931-1934 by Anais Nin

The Diary of Anais Nin Volume 1:  1931 – 1934

Anais Nin

Non-fiction

This volume encompasses her friendship with Henry Miller and his wife June, her complicated relationship with her father, her interest in psychoanalysis and her struggle as an artist. She immensely talks about the self, and her search for the woman, Anais. She writes, “I have always been tormented by the image of multiplicity of selves. Some days I call it richness, and other days I see it as a disease, a proliferation as dangerous as cancer. My first concept about people around me was that all of them were coordinated into a WHOLE, whereas I was made up of a multitude of selves, of fragments.” I am mesmerized with her insights about the facets of woman penned with so much candor and passion.

Anais Nin is absolutely the writer I endeavor to become. She writes beautifully, elegantly and articulately. Even the most tedious thing that happen in her life comes alive because of her mastery with words. She is drunk with life. Whenever I read her diary, it gives me such a feverish delusion that I could write like her, too.

I could only wish I was less critical of my own writing to write freely and unbound as she did. This is a deeply powerful read–I recommend it to all women readers.

Wait. How does one even review a diary? I am doing her no justice.

PS: The fact that this is an expurgated diary eluded me. I feel really daft. HAHA

 

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most anticipated read 2016

 

book mails are the best!

18986278_1525958767455315_758956768_o i got this book this afternoon and i couldn’t be happier. i have been a fan of osamu dazai since i have seen the anime aoi bungaku. i didn’t want to finish it as i’ve decided to get the books.

i was in the japanese bookstagram community for the past few weeks and i absolutely fell in love with the japanese covers of books – their minimalistic approach to it.

this book is one of my most anticipated reads this 2016. i’ve read no longer human, his controversial work but i’ve read in a few articles that the setting sun is the highlight of his writing career. i am one for doom and gloom books and osamu dazai is just the  man.

osamu dazai committed suicide after “no longer human” was published. that book was believed to be his autobiography. speculations arise when some of the aspects in the books actually reflected his life. although, we may not know that.

his books are depressing. i felt my mood gradually dampen as i was reading that book and i wanted to see if this one lived up to the masterpiece that everyone is talking about.

i like to read challenging books, books that will derange my thoughts.

i’ll try to keep sane. 😀

xoxo cherie

book review: the wise man’s fear by patrick rothfuss

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Alas. I have managed to finish this book.

Some parts were excruciatingly monotonous, arcs that I felt very tedious and add little to the main plot, but it did little to drench my fiery love for this red-haired unassuming innkeeper.

My review is pretty much the same as book one except for the harsh points I have mentioned above.

In book two, we have more adventures, heart breaking scenes and gut-wrenching actions. We also uncover parts of the Four Corners of Civilization, Vintas and Ademre, which I think had the best and worst moments. This is most important when you read this series. It is not your usual story plot of introduction-climax-resolution, you will be disappointed. The main plot is overshadowed with so many subplots you’d think the main plot is the subplot. The book was somewhat anticlimactic for me as Kvothe is telling the story himself, so when he’s in a life threatening condition you just know he’ll live.

This book is not about a hero bred to defeat armies or dragons. It’s the story of Kvothe. It’s his story, his defeats and his victories.

Book two pretty much built an enthusiasm so great I can even compare it to the Promise of Spring.

I recently came to know that this was already commissioned for a movie, a TV series and a video game. I think that is enough for you to pick this book and read it.

 

Rating: 5/5 stars

book review: rebecca by daphne du maurier

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Rating: blue-star-hiblue-star-hiblue-star-hiblue-star-hiblue-star-hi/5 Stars

Rebecca is a story of two women, a man and a house.

When in Monte Carlo, our heroine, a paid companion (a modern personal assistant) of an insufferable woman called Mrs Van Hopper, chances to meet Mr de Winter the esteemed owner of the majestic house called Manderley.

Our heroine, finds herself in love with the compelling Mr de Winter and immediately accepts the marriage proposal after several acquaintances. Soon she becomes the new mistress of Manderley.

In constant comparison with the most loved and admired late Rebecca de Winter, she struggles to find her place in the midst of her legacy. Manderley, a living, breathing and hellish gothic mansion further torments our heroine and finds it difficult to adjust into a more luxurious lifestyle and the haunting presence of Rebecca.

Rebecca is hauntingly beautiful, a gripping and riveting novel that is sure to keep you glued to your seat. With its poetic narrative we slowly discover the horrifying secrets of Manderley and Rebecca. Mrs Danvers is an unforgettable character, menacing in her own way adds up to the overall eerie feeling of Manderley.

Definitely a must-read for readers of crime and mystery, psychological thrillers and surprisingly so, the very core of the book, romance.

We Need To Talk About Kevin by Lionel Shriver

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Rating: blue-star-hiblue-star-hiblue-star-hiblue-star-hi blue-star-hiof 5 STARS

After 2 years from the gruesome and horrific massacre designed by Kevin Katchadourian, Eva’s 16 year old son; Eva recollects the events through a series of letters to her estranged husband claiming that she may be responsible for driving her son off the rails.

An ode to literature, We Need To Talk About Kevin is a wonderfully written book that will move and make your heart swell. There’s just something sad and devastating about the entirety of this book that will keep you thinking long after you’ve read it.